Saturday , June 23 2018
kota, rajasthan

Kota – Rajasthan

Kota

Kota, Rajasthan, formerly known as Kotah, is the 25th largest district in the northern Indian state of Rajasthan. It is located 240 kilometres south of state capital, Jaipur. Situated on the banks of Chambal River, and has been identified as a counter-magnet city for the National Capital Region to attract migrants and develop as an alternative centre of growth to Delhi. Kota has a number of engineering and medical entrance exam coaching institutes and its nickname is “Education City of India”.

Kota is also known for its palaces and gardens. Kota is reportedly the only Indian city besides Thiruvananthapuram that receives a continuous 24-hour water supply.

Geographically Kota is located along eastern bank of the Chambal River in the southern part of Rajasthan. It is the third largest city of Rajasthan after Jaipur and Jodhpur.

The history of the city dates back to the 12th century AD when the Hada clan, a Chauhan Rajput chieftain, Rao Deva, conquered the territory and founded Bundi and Hadoti. Later, in the early 17th century, during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Jahangir, the ruler of Bundi – Rao Ratan Singh, gave the smaller principality of Kota to his son, Madho Singh. Since then Kota became a hallmark of the Rajput gallantry and culture.

City Palace & Fort

The fort and the palace within it make up one of the largest such developments in Rajasthan. This was the royal residence and centre of power, housing the Kota princedom’s treasury, courts, arsenal, armed forces and state offices. Some of its buildings are now used as schools. The City Palace, entered through a gateway topped by rampant elephants, contains the offbeat Rao Madho Singh Museum , where you’ll find everything for a respectable Raj existence, from silver furniture to weaponry, as well as perhaps India’s most depressingly moth-eaten stuffed trophy animals.

Rao Madho Singh Museum

The City Palace, entered through a gateway topped by rampant elephants, contains the offbeat Rao Madho Singh Museum, where you’ll find everything for a respectable Raj existence, from silver furniture to weaponry.

Kishore Sagar

This picturesque artificial lake was constructed in 1346. In the middle, on a small island amid palm trees, is the enchanting little tangerine palace of Jagmandir . Built in 1740 by one of the maharanis of Kota, it’s a sight that seems to mock the frantic streets on either side of the lake. The palace, sadly, is closed to the public.

Government Museum

Near Kishore Sagar, this small, run-down government museum has a collection of 9th- to 12th-century stone idols, a 3rd-century inscription and Copper Age sculptural fragments, as well as some miniature paintings. It is not worth a visit unless you are truly archaeologically bent.

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